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Unconventional Methods Of Measuring Social Media Success

I find it interesting that there are people who base their “social media success” on how many friends, followers and connections he or she has in his or her network on social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn, respectively.

If that is how your company chooses to base its “success” (on a quantitative level), then more power to you and your business!

I, however, like to view social media success through a more qualitative lens. I like to think how many people in my network are engaged and responsive, versus how many people in my network do I have to struggle to get a response from?

See the difference? See how the latter question is much more difficult to attain an answer to than the former?

But how does one know IF he or she HAS achieved that qualitative success–those engaged friends, followers or connections?

Sure, there are tools and “apps” that will help you gauge your social media success. We see those types of articles frequently posted by social media and PR news hubs such as PRDaily and SocialMediaExaminer.

Here are some methods that I’ve found helpful that are not as conventional as methods you might find in other articles, and can be determined regardless of your personal network size:

 

  • [LinkedIn] >> Profile Views

    In my opinion, the profile views option on LinkedIn is one of the most underrated privileges a person has on this social networking site. In this section of your LinkedIn profile page (usually the bottom right portion of the screen), you have the opportunity to see how many visitors have viewed your profile within the past “#” days.

    If you’re looking to build a strong network, this number is very important. In essence, this amount tells you how many people are trying to connect with you or simply want to find out more about you. The lower the number, consider this: is my profile difficult to find? Have I given people enough reason/opportunity to find me on LinkedIn?

 

  • [Twitter] >> Follower to List Ratio

    How many lists are following you on Twitter? One? Seven? None?
    I have such sincere appreciation for users who have included me in their Twitter lists. The fact that one of my followers is engaged enough in what I have to say (or… Tweet) that he or she would find my Twitter account and closely track my feed isn’t something to be taken for granted.
    There are other bloggers who have laid out how to calculate your Follower to List Ratio and you’re more than welcome to figure it out on your own. IF you figure it out, let me know what your number is!
    Having a large amount of followers on Twitter is great… but how many of those followers are engaged enough to include you in their lists?

 

  • [Wordpress] >> Retweets and Comments Per Page View

    We would be apt to think that the more posts one puts on his or her page, the more view he or she will get and the more activity the blog will see. How can a blogger, then, be able to calculate just how much success (again, the quality) he or she is gaining from all these views.
    Two ways: 1) consider how many comments you’re getting per post. Me? I’m not getting a whole LOT of comments because my network isn’t huge and I’ve only just started blogging. 2) How many retweets has your blog received? If you’ve received 800 page views and only 10 retweets, you’ve essentially gained 1 retweet for every 80 page views — not the best, but better than nothing, eh?

Tips For Using LinkedIn To Get A New Job

Last month, I applied at a local marketing agency [which I will refer to it as JobOne]. I interviewed but didn’t hear back from them. A few days after interviewing with JobOne, I applied and was hired at my current job [which I will refer to it as NewJob]. A week after starting my new position, I received an email from the President/CEO of JobOne, saying something to the extent of:

Carlos,

I was recently looking at your LinkedIn account and see you’ve found employment. I am very disappointed in my company for not getting back to you sooner. While we are very pleased and wish you the best at NewJob, I suppose this gives truth to the saying, ‘If you snooze… you lose.’
If your situation ever changes, however, please be sure to contact me, as we would gladly take you in.

President/CEO of JobOne

My first thought? WOW–they’d want to hire me.
My second thought? Potential employers ACTUALLY check out LinkedIn!
My final thought? How can I optimize my profile for other future employers to find me a strong candidate for employment?

Here are five tips I’ve found in research (and experience) on how to use LinkedIn to find a job:

  • Take the initiative and search for jobs yourself
    LinkedIn offers its users a GREAT source of employment opportunities, if they know how to search. Simply go to the LinkedIn Jobs page and type in the search bar what field you’re looking for (e.g., public relations, social media, management, etc.) and simply hit “Search.”

 

  • Optimize your profile
    I’ve seen too many profiles that are not completely filled out. Does every single detail need to be filled out on your LinkedIn profile? No, not necessarily. Fill out vital information (e.g., job history, skill set, interests) and delve into your network. Join LinkedIn Groups and see who’s talking in that group and then join the conversation they’re having. Use LinkedIn applications and develop a user-specific URL for your profile so you can easily direct people to it. Example: linkedin.com/in/YOURNAME.
  • Update your status ASAP
    As soon as you begin the job search, update your status to let your connections know that you’re searching for a new job and you are well-qualified, after years of studying (or working at a previous job).
    You might have some connections that are looking for a new employee (or maybe THEY know someone and can refer you).
  • Get relevant recommendations
    It’s great to know that your personal friends think you’re “such a funny guy” BUT, when it comes to LinkedIn, find former managers, professors, colleagues and clients to give you professional recommendations. If a recruiter looks at your profile, he or she is going to want to know what other people are saying and think about you.
  • See who knows who
    This is fun–it is kind of like you’re a “professional investigator,” trying to help yourself: run a search on LinkedIn for a prospective employer’s company name, while cross-referencing any colleges you’ve attended, and your past workplaces. Doing so, you can pull up anyone you know who is or has been involved with a prospective employer. Ask if he or she has any insight to the company’s culture and how he or she was successful in getting a job there. EVEN BETTER: if he or she knows the person in charge of the company’s hiring, he or she may be able to help you with an inside connection.

Turn My Internship Into A Job? How?

Stand out in the crowd--Increase your chances of making that internship a job.

Before I graduated college, I held an internship with a business incubator at California State University, Fresno, as its public relations specialist. The Lyles Center taught me quite a bit about one’s stereotypical internship — trust me, an internship isn’t necessarily just all about stuffing envelopes and licking stamps.

Rather, an internship can be whatever it is you make it out to be.
Am I still working with the Lyles Center? No.
Did I find a job thanks to the Lyles Center? Yes.

There are a few things you should know/do, in order to increase your chances of finding employment after (or during) that internship:

  • Say Hello
    Anyone else familiar with that awkward silence when walking past somebody and you both stare off into the distance, look at your phone or at your hand–anywhere BUT the person about to walk past you?
    Don’t do that.
    When you pass by somebody –the mail person, your boss, the company’s CEO– just take two seconds to say “Hello.” It will immediately do three things: 1) Ease the awkwardness, 2) Potentially brighten up your day (or there’s) because you didn’t ignore one another, and 3) Make you a memorable person.
    After you greet that other person with a simple ‘hello,’ he or she will be sure to remember you and would be much more willing to keep an intern who is personable rather than one who looks at his or her hand to avoid acknowledgement with others!
  • Participate
    Be involved in the company you’re interning with. Do they have a ‘party planning committee’? Join it. Do they hold regular company meetings? Ask questions. Give suggestions.
    Businesses don’t simply want an intern to do work for them–they want an intern who will invest with them and help the company grow in new ways.
    Even if you’re in a meeting and you simply say “Yes, I agree with the new policy because…” you will be noticed by people in the office who may not have noticed you before. Standing out to a company can be very helpful for you in the future.
  • Be Willing
    If you’ve been to many interviews (or even just a couple), this question will usually arise: “Tell us about yourself.” It’s the dreaded question many of us don’t quite know how to properly answer. One of things that you can’t go wrong in saying is that you are willing to do anything for the company.
    Companies want to hire employees that are willing to partake in anything and willing to take on extra tasks (but also willing to speak up if you can’t make a deadline).
    This trait can take a multitude of levels.
    Remember the Lyles Center that I worked for? There was a side project I did at Fresno State for “Squirrel Appreciation Week” where I dressed up as a squirrel. Did that make me memorable? You bet it did. Among everyone in the office, I was the only one willing to dress in the costume, and among everyone in the office, I was one of the only employees who everybody knew.
    I’m not saying you have to dress as the company mascot–I’m saying that it is your willingness as an employee that will help you attain a job.
  • Strive
    People who tend to get the full-time job offers are those who are in it for the long haul. People who will stay the extra hours in the office to finish up a report and complete a presentation are the people who are most likely to be looked at and considered first when hiring season commences.
    Keep up with your former job contacts, even if it’s been months after your internship has ended. Lend a hand of projects or events that the company might be doing (even if your internship is over).
    Don’t wait for offers to come to you — go to them.

If you remember nothing else, remember this — With persistence, you can make things happen.

You don't have to dress like a squirrel at your internship... but I did.

QR Codes: What Are They? How Do I Get One? Are They At Your Church?

If you work in a marketing or public relations department, chances are you’ve already heard those two letters that are [supposedly] the “newest venture” of advertising: Q.R.

Then you probably sat back in your chair and said to yourself: What does Q.R. stand for? Quick Research? Questionable Response? Qualitative Reading?

The actual definition is simply Quick Response. The full title? Quick Response Code (QR Code).

What is a QR Code?

Use a QR Reader to Scan the QR Code and Visit Me On LinkedIn

If you haven’t heard of them by now, I’ll break them down in a few easy points:

  • Originating in Japan, QR Codes bring a new method of advertising to the general public
  • A QR Code can be read (or scanned) by QR readers on your smartphone (Android, iPhone, etc.)
  • QR Codes will take a piece of transitory media and put it in your phone
  • A two-dimensional barcode, a QR Code, has incoded in it either a URL, text or other information that will appear once it is scanned

Simple!

How are QR Codes being used?

QR Codes are already being used on product packaging, magazine articles, advertisements on billboards and buses and even some shirts have the two-dimensional barcode printed on them.

Some young professionals are now placing QR Codes on a printed resume (or a business card), presenting that to a potential employer, leading said employer to the young professional’s online portfolio.

Now, you may even find some churches using QR Codes to link to a religious podcast or the church’s website to find additional information from the bulletin.

How can I generate a QR Code?

Initially, I was under the impression that I’d have to hire someone a couple hundred dollars to generate a QR Code for my LinkedIn profile (see image at the top of this post), but it turns out I didn’t have to spend a penny!

There are a few different QR Code generating websites to which you simply input your URL and a barcode will develop for you, in seconds:

  • Kaywa — Allows you to develop a code for a URL, text, a phone number or an SMS. This website also gives you the opportunity to select the size code you want (S, M, L, XL).
  • Querify! — Gives you the option to input any type of text you’d like, and also provides you with the four easy steps to make that code you’ve always wanted.
  • Delivr — There’s room for “error” with Delivr, as this generator gives you the option to select how large of a margin you want your code to have and how much room for ‘error’ you want to allow for a QR reader.
  • Create QR Code — One of the simplest sites to develop your code, CreateQRCode simply asks you to input your text and select the dimesions you want your code in and that’s it!

Very easy, isn’t it?

Where have YOU seen QR Codes? Have you scanned any of them? What did you think? Were they useful?